Diagram of facial bones-Facial skeleton - Wikipedia

Facial bones. Image: Facial Bones. Image: Maxilla. Image: Palatine Bone. Image: Zygomatic Bone.

Diagram of facial bones

Diagram of facial bones

Diagram of facial bones

Diagram of facial bones

Others, like the mandible and vomer, are Diagram of facial bones. The two large parietal bones are connected and make up part of the roof and sides of the human skull. Facial bones The fourteen bones that form the human facial skeleton. It articulates with the first vertebra of the spinal cord and also contains the foramen magnum, the large opening of the skill through which the spinal cord passes as it enters the vertebral facal. Learning Objectives List the facial bones of the viscerocranium. Sensory organs. The orbits are conical, sometimes described as four-sided pyramidal, cavities that open in the midline of the face and point backwards. The neurocranium is formed from the occipital bone, Tracy mcmanus temporal bones, two Diagfam bones, faxial sphenoid, ethmoid and frontal bones; they are all joined together with sutures.

Porn movie libary. General Features and Functions of the Skull

The mandible is generally considered separately from the cranium. Horizontal plate Posterior nasal spine Perpendicular plate Ov Diagram of facial bones canalSphenopalatine foramen Hard palate. Some infants are born with a condition called craniosynostosiswhich involves the premature closing of skull sutures. The spinal cord i. Definition : air-filled cavities lined with mucous membranes located within some skull bones. TA98 : A Commonly non-medically referred to as the Cheek Bone because it forms the prominent part of the cheeks. Neurocranium is shown in semi-transparent. Central nervous system. Image: Inferior Nasal Concha. Thin Graduate flashing triangular plate of bone on the floor of the og cavity and part of the nasal septum. Purple: Mandible 1. Dark green: Zygomatic bones 2.

Figure 1 identifies the various bone structures of the head and face.

  • Facial bones.
  • Your skull provides structure to your head and face while also protecting your brain.

The human skull is the part of the skeleton that supports the structures of the face and forms a cavity for the brain.

The skull supports the musculature and structures of the face and forms a protective cavity for the brain. The skull is formed of several bones which, with the exception of the mandible, are joined together by sutures—synarthrodial immovable joints.

The adult human skull is comprised of twenty-two bones which are divided into two parts of differing embryological origin: the neurocranium and the viscerocranium.

The neurocranium forms the cranial cavity that surrounds and protects the brain and brainstem. The neurocranium is formed from the occipital bone, two temporal bones, two parietal bones, the sphenoid, ethmoid and frontal bones; they are all joined together with sutures. Components of neurocranium : Neurocranium consists of 8 parts: frontal, sphenoid, ethmoid, occipital, 2 temporal, and 2 parietal bones.

The viscerocranium bones form the anterior and lower regions of the skull and include the mandible, which attaches through the only truly motile joint found in the skull.

The facial skeleton contains the vomer, two nasal conchae, two nasal bones, two maxilla, the mandible, two palatine bones, two zygomatic bones, and two lacrimal bones. The skull also contains the sinuses. These are air-filled cavities that contribute to lessening the weight of the skull with a minimal reduction in strength.

They contribute to resonance of the voice and assist in the warming and moistening of air inhaled via the nose. The neurocranium is comprised of eight bones: occipital, two temporal bones, two parietal bones, sphenoid, ethmoid, and the frontal bone. The neurocranium consists of the occipital bone, two temporal bones, two parietal bones, the sphenoid, ethmoid, and frontal bones—all are joined together with sutures. Evolutionary,it is the expansion of the neurocranium that has facilitated the expansion of the brain and its associated developments.

Neurocranium : A lateral view showing the bones that structure the neurocranium. The occipital bone forms the base of the skull at the rear of the cranium. It articulates with the first vertebra of the spinal cord and also contains the foramen magnum, the large opening of the skill through which the spinal cord passes as it enters the vertebral column.

The occipital bone borders the parietal bones through the heavily serrated lambdoidal suture, and also the temporal bones through occipitomastoid suture. The temporal bones are situated at the base and sides of the skull, lateral to the temporal lobes of the brain.

The temporal bones consist of four regions the squamous, mastoid, petrous and tympanic regions. Inferior to the squamous is the mastoid region, and fused between the squamous and mastoid regions is the petrous region. Finally, the small and inferior tympanic region lies anteriorly to the mastoid. The two large parietal bones are connected and make up part of the roof and sides of the human skull. The two bones articulate to form the sagittal suture.

In the front, the parietal bones form the coronal suture with the frontal bone, and in the rear, the lambdoid suture is formed by the occipital bone. Finally, the squamosal suture separates the parietal and temporal bones. The sphenoid bone is situated in the middle of the skull towards the front and forms the rear of the orbit. It has been described as resembling a butterfly due to its wing-like processes.

The sphenoid bone is divided into several parts: the body of the bone, two greater wings, two lesser wings, and the pterygoid processes. The body that forms the middle of the sphenoid bone articulates with the ethmoid and occipital bone and forms a key part of the nasal cavity; it also contains the sphenoidal sinuses.

The greater wings form the floor of the middle cranial fossa that houses the frontal lobes and pituitary gland, and also the posterior wall of the orbit. The lesser wings project laterally and form the floor of the anterior cranial fossa and the superior orbital fissure through which several key optical nerves pass. The ethmoid bone is a small bone in the skull that separates the nasal cavity from the brain. It is lightweight due to its spongy, air-filled construction and is located at the roof of the nose and between the two orbits.

The ethmoid bone forms the medial wall of the orbit, the roof of the nasal cavity, and due to its central location it articulates with numerous bones of the viscerocranium. Inside the neurocranium it articulates with the frontal and sphenoid bones. The frontal bone borders two other neurocranial bones—the parietal bones through the coronal sutures and the sphenoid bone through the sphenofrontal suture.

It also articulates with the zygomatic and nasal bones and the maxilla. The viscerocranium face includes these bones: vomer, 2 inferior nasal conchae, 2 nasals, maxilla, mandible, palatine, 2 zygomatics, and 2 lacrimals. The viscerocranium or facial bones supports the soft tissue of the face. The viscerocranium consists of 14 individual bones that fuse together. However, the hyoid bone, ethmoid bone, and sphenoid bones are sometimes included in the viscerocranium.

The two zygomatic bones form the cheeks and contribute to the orbits. They articulate with the frontal, temporal, maxilla, and sphenoid bones. The two lacrimal bones form the medial wall of the orbit and articulate with the frontal, ethmoid, maxilla, and inferior nasal conchae. The lacrimal bones are the two smallest bones located in the face. The two slender nasal bones located in the midline of the face fuse to form the bridge of the noise and also articulate with the frontal, ethmoid and maxilla bones.

The inferior nasal conchae are located within the nasal cavity. At the base of the nasal cavity is the small vomer bone which forms the nasal septum. The maxilla bones fuse in the midline and form the upper jaw. They provide the bed for the upper teeth, the floor of the nose, and the base of the orbits. The maxilla articulates with the zygomatic, nasal, lacrimal, and palatine bones.

The palatine bones fuse in the midline to form the palatine, located at the back of the nasal cavity that forms the roof of the mouth and the floor of the orbit.

Finally, the mandible forms the lower jaw of the skull. Facial bones : There are fourteen facial bones. Some, like the lacrimal and nasal bones, are paired.

Others, like the mandible and vomer, are singular. The orbit, or eye socket, is the cavity located in the skull in which the eye and its associated appendages are housed. The orbits are conical, sometimes described as four-sided pyramidal, cavities that open in the midline of the face and point backwards.

To the rear of the orbit, the optic foramen opens into the optical canal through which the optic nerve and ophthalmic artery pass. The orbital cavity is formed from seven bones.

The frontal bone forms the superior border of the orbital rim and also the superior wall roof of the orbital surface. Completing the basal and medial border of the orbital rim is the maxillary bone, which also forms the inferior wall floor of the orbital surface. The lacrimal and ethmoid bones contribute to the medial wall of the orbit and also to the medial wall of the orbital canal.

The small palatine bone contributes to the floor of the orbit. Finally, the sphenoid bone forms the posterior wall of the orbit and also contributes to the formation of the optic canal. The human skull has numerous holes known as foramina through which cranial nerves, arteries, veins, and other structures pass.

Base of the skull upper surface : This image details the foramina of the skull. In anatomy, a foramen is any opening.

Foramina inside the body of humans and other animals typically allow muscles, nerves, arteries, veins, or other structures to connect one part of the body with another.

The human skull has numerous foramina through which cranial nerves, arteries, veins, and other structures pass. The skull bones that contain foramina include the frontal, ethmoid, sphenoid, maxilla, palatine, temporal, and occipital lobes.

A suture is a type of fibrous joint or synarthrosis that only occurs in the skull or cranium. A suture is a type of fibrous joint or synarthrosis that only occurs in the skull. A small amount of movement is permitted through these sutures that contributes to the compliance and elasticity of the skull.

At birth, many of the bones of the skull remain unfused to the soft spots described as fontanelle. The bones fuse relatively rapidly through a process known as craniosynotosis, although the relative positions of the bones can continue to change through life. In old age the cranial sutures may ossify completely, reducing the amount of elasticity present in the skull. As such, the degree of ossification can be a useful tool in determining age postmortem. Lateral view of a skull showing sutures : The dotted red lines indicate the location of skull sutures.

The paranasal sinuses four, paired, air-filled spaces surround the nasal cavity, and are located above and between the eyes, and behind the ethmoids.

Skull Sinuses : This image shows the position of the sinuses in the human skull. Paranasal sinuses are a group of four, paired, air-filled spaces that surround the nasal cavity maxillary sinuses , above the eyes frontal sinuses , between the eyes ethmoid sinuses , and behind the eyes sphenoid sinuses. The sinuses are named for the facial bones that they are located behind.

The paranasal sinuses form developmentally through excavation of bone by air-filled sacs pneumatic diverticula from the nasal cavity. The biological role of the sinuses is debated, but a number of possible functions have been proposed. These include:. Superior view of infant skull : This image shows the location of the anterior frontal and posterior fontanelles. The ossification of the bones of the skull causes the fontanelles to close over a period of 18 to 24 months; they eventually form the sutures of the neurocranium.

The cranium of a newborn consists of five main bones: two frontal bones, two parietal bones, and one occipital bone. These are joined by fibrous sutures that allow movement that facilitates childbirth and brain growth.

At birth, the skull features a small posterior fontanelle an open area covered by a tough membrane where the two parietal bones adjoin the occipital bone at the lambda. This is called intramembranous ossification. The mesenchymal connective tissue turns into bone tissue.

The much larger, diamond-shaped anterior fontanelle—where the two frontal and two parietal bones join—generally remains open until a child is about two years old. The anterior fontanelle is useful clinically, as examination of an infant includes palpating the anterior fontanelle. Two smaller fontanelles are located on each side of the head. Lateral view of infant skull : This image show the location of the sphenoidal and mastoid fontanelles.

Cranial CT Scan. Bones of the Face. Main support structure of the nasal cavity. Accuracy cannot be guaranteed. Allows flexion and extension of the head. Anterior to the temporal bones and forms the base of cranium - behind the orbitals. Has a large opening called the Foramen Magnus which the spinal cord passes through.

Diagram of facial bones

Diagram of facial bones

Diagram of facial bones

Diagram of facial bones

Diagram of facial bones

Diagram of facial bones. FACIAL BONES DIAGRAM

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Facial bones - human anatomy organs

Facial bones. Image: Facial Bones. Image: Maxilla. Image: Palatine Bone. Image: Zygomatic Bone. Image: Lacrimal Bone. Image: Nasal Bone. Image: Inferior Nasal Concha. Image: Vomer. Image: Mandible. Image: Hyoid Bone. Autonomic nervous system. Central nervous system. Circulatory system. Digestive system. Endocrine system.

Female reproductive system. Lymphatic system. Male Reproductive System. Muscular system. Peripheral nervous system. Respiratory System. Sensory organs. Skeletal System. Urinary system.

Diagram of facial bones

Diagram of facial bones

Diagram of facial bones